Larvae Stage

Have you reviewed the intro to insect life stages page? We recommend this page before continuing on.

Caddisfly, Order: Trichoptera

caddisl

Caddis larvae can be free-living or live in cases. Caddis larvae will make their cases from sticks, gravel and sand. The free-living larvae seldom have gills that are along the sides of their abdomen. Go to caddis pupa.

Midges, Order: Diptera

midgel

Midge larvae look like long slender maggots. The rear of their body will have either gills, hairs, prolegs or breathing tubes. They will not have segmented legs. Go to midge pupae.

Hellgrammites or Dobsonfly, Order: Megaloptera

dobsonl

The dobsonfly larva (hellgrammite) has many filamentous appendages on each side of his abdomen. Their back end is forked with two hooks on each tail. Hellgrammites will have six jointed legs on their thorax and large pinchers for mouth parts. Hellgramites are dark brown or black in color. The underside of the abdomen will have gill tufts. Pupa develop out of water. Can be confused with the fishfly.

Alderfly, Order: Megaloptera

alderl

Alderflies have a single feathery tail. The abdomen has strand like appendages extending from each side. The thorax has six jointed legs and large pinchers for mouth parts. Pupa develop out of water.

Fishfly, Order: Megaloptera

fishflyl

The fishfly has many filamentous appendages on each side of his abdomen. Their back end is forked with two hooks on each tail. Fishflies will have six jointed legs on their thorax and large pinchers for mouth parts. Fishflies are light in color. The underside of the abdomen is smooth with no gill tufts. Pupa develop out of water. Can be confused with the hellgrammite.

Aquatic Moth, Order: Lepidoptera

mothl

Aquatic moth larvae will usually be found on the sides of rocks covered with a silken blanket. They will have several sets of prolegs on their abdomen which when viewed through a magnifier will have tiny hooks on the end called crochets. Go to moth pupae.

Beetle,
Order: Coleoptera